Olde Abbeville  SCV Camp #39
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THE CONFEDERATE COURIER

Newsletter of Olde Abbeville Camp # 39
Sons of Confederate Veterans

June, 2011

Upcoming Events and Opportunities
Olde Abbeville Camp #39 will meet Monday, June 13, 2011, at 6:30 PM at the Grange Hall, Greenwood SC. Our speaker will be Ken Temples; he will do a program on E.M. Bounds of Missouri.

Onion Fund Raiser - Everyone needs to turn in their “onion money” to Johnny Lawrence at the June meeting. Checks would be preferred.

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American Civil War (War For Southern Independence) A Partial Summary of Battles:
Tranter's Creek
Civil War North Carolina
June 5, 1862
On June 5, Colonel Robert Potter, garrison commander at Washington, North Carolina, ordered a reconnaissance in the direction of Pactolus.
The 24th Massachusetts under Lieutenant Colonel F.A. Osborne, advanced to the bridge over Tranter's Creek, where it encountered the 44th North Carolina, under Colonel George Singletary.
Unable to force a crossing, Osborne brought his artillery to bear on the mill buildings in which the Confederates were barricaded.
Colonel Singletary was killed in the bombardment, and his troops retreated.
The Federals did not pursue and returned to their fortifications at Washington.
Result(s): Union victory
Location: Pitt County, North Carolina
Campaign: Burnside's North Carolina Expedition (January – July 1862)
Date(s): June 5, 1862
Principle Commanders: Lieutenant Colonel F.A. Osborne (USA); Colonel George Singletary (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Regiments
Estimated Casualties: 40 total

Memphis Tennessee
June 6, 1862
After the Confederate River Defense Fleet, commanded by Captain James E. Montgomery and Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson (Missouri State Guard), bested the Union ironclad at Plum Run Bend, Tennessee, on May 10, 1862, they retired to Memphis.
Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard ordered troops out of Fort Pillow and Memphis on June 4, after learning of Union Major General Henry W; Hallack's occupation of Corinth, Mississippi. Thompson's few troops camped outside Memphis, and Montgomery's fleet were the only force available to meet the Union naval threat to the city.
From Island Number 45, just north of Memphis, Flag-Officer Charles H. Davis and Colonel Charles Ellet launched a naval attack on Memphis after 4:00 AM on June 6, 1862, Arriving off Memphis about 5:30 AM, the battle began.
In the hour and a half battle, the Union boats sank or captured all but one of the Confederate vessels; General Van Dorn escaped.
Immediately following the battle, Colonel Ellet's son, Medical Cadet Charles Ellet, Jr., met the mayor of Memphis and raised the Union colors over the courthouse. Later Flag-Officer Davis officially received the surrender of the city from the mayor. The Indiana Brigade, commanded by Colonel G.N. Fitch, then occupied the city.
Memphis, an important commercial and economic center on the Mississippi River, had fallen, opening another section of the river to Union shipping.
Result(s): Union victory
Location: Shelby County, Tennessee
Campaign: Joint Operations on the Middle Mississippi River (1862)
Date(s): June 6, 1862
Principle Commanders: Flag-Officer Charles H. Davis and Colonel Charles Ellet (USA);
Captain James E. Montgomery and Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson (CSA)
Forces Engaged: U.S. Ironclads Benton, Louisville, Carondelet, Cairo and St. Louis and U.S. Army Rams
Queen of the West and Monarch (USA); C.S. Navy Rams General Beauregard,
General Bragg, General Sumter and Little Rebel (CSA)
Estimated Casualties: 181 total (USA 1; CSA 180)

Cross Keys
Civil War Virginia
June 8, 1862
Moving up the Shenandoah Valley in pursuit of Jackson's army, Major General John C. Fremont's army encountered Major General Richard S. Ewell's divisions at Cross Keys on June 8, 1862.
Brigadier General Julius Stahel's brigade, attacking on the Union left, was stunned by a surprise volley from Trimble's command and driven back in confusion.
After feeling out other parts of the Confederate line, Fremont withdrew to the Keezletown Road under protection of his batteries.
The next day, Trimble's and Patton's brigades held Fremont at bay, while the rest of Ewell's force crossed the river to assist in the defeat of Brigadier General E. Tyler's command at Port Republic.
Result(s): Confederate victory
Location: Rockingham County, Virginia
Campaign: Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign (March – June 1862)
Date(s): June 8, 1862
Principle Commanders: Major General John C. Fremont (USA); Major General Richard S. Ewell (CSA)
Forces Engaged: 17,300 total (USA 11,500; CSA 5,800)
Estimated Casualties: 951 total (USA 664; CSA 287)

Port Republic
Civil War Virginia
June 9, 1862
Major General T.J. Jackson concentrated his forces east of the South Fork of the Shenandoah against the isolated brigades of Tyler and Carroll of Shield's division, Brigadier General Erastus Tyler commanding. Confederate assaults across the bottomland were repulsed with heavy casualties, but a flanking column turned the Union left flank at the Coaling.
Union counterattacks failed to reestablish the line, and Tyler was forced to retreat.
Confederate forces at Cross Keys marched to Join Jackson at Port Republic, burning the North River Bridge behind them. Freemont's army arrived too late to assist Tyler and Carroll and watched helplessly from across the rainswollen river.
After these dual defeats at Cross Keys and Port Republic, the Union armies retreated, leaving Jackson in control of the upper and middle Shenandoah Valley and freeing his army to reinforce Lee before Richmond.
Result(s): Confederate victory
Location: Rockingham County, Virginia
Campaign: Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign (March – June 1862)
Date(s): June 9, 1862
Principle Commanders: Brigadier General Erastus Tyler (USA); Major General T.J. Jackson (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Divisions: 9,500 total (USA 3,500; CSA 6,000)
Estimated Casualties: 1,818 total (USA 1,002; CSA 816)

Secessionville
Civil War South Carolina
June 16, 1862
Early June 1862, Major General David Hunter transported Horatio G. Wright's and Isaac I. Steven's Union divisions under immediate direction of Brigadier General Henry Benham to James Island where they entrenched at Grimball's Landing near the southern flank of the Confederate defenses.
On June 16, contrary to Hunter's orders, Benham launched an unsuccessful frontal assault against Fort Lamar at Secessionville.
Because Benham was said to have disobeyed orders, Hunter relieved him of command.
Result(s): Confederate victory
Location: City of Charleston, South Carolina
Campaign: Operations against Charleston (June 1862)
Date(s): June 16, 1862
Principle Commanders: Brigadier General Henry Benham (USA); Brigadier General Nathan Evans (CSA)
Forces Engaged: 8,600 total (USA 6,600; CSA 2,000)
Estimated Casualties: 889 total (USA 685; CSA 204)

Saint Charles
Civil War Arkansas
June 17, 1862
On the morning of June 17, 1862, USS Mound City, St.Louis, Lexington, Conestoga, and transports proceeded up the White River towards Saint Charles attempting to resupply Major General Samuel R. Curtis's army near Jacksonport.
A few miles below Saint Charles, the 46th Indiana Infantry under the command of Colonel Graham N. Fitch disembarked, formed a skirmish line, and proceeded upriver towards the Rebel batteries on Saint Charles bluffs, under the command of Captain Joseph Fry, CSN.
At the same time, the Union gunboats went upriver to engage the Rebel batteries; Mound City was hit and her steam drum exploded, scalding most of the crew to death.
More than 125 sailors from the Mound City were killed, but the other ship was towed to safety.
Colonel Fitch halted the gunboat activities to prevent further loss and then undertook an attack on the Confederate batteries with his infantry.
He turned the Rebel flank, which ended the firing from the batteries, and left Saint Charles open to Federal occupation.
Result(s): Union victory
Location: Arkansas County
Campaign: Operations on the White River (1862)
Date(s): June 17, 1862
Principle Commanders: Colonel Graham N. Fitch and Commander Augustus H. Kilty (USA);
Captain Joseph Fry, CSN (CSA)
Forces Engaged: 46th Indiana and Union gunboats (USA); 50 men and CSN boats (CSA)
Estimated Casualties: 290 total (USA 135; CSA 155)

Simmon's Bluff
Civil War South Carolina
June 21, 1862
In June, the Federals besieging Charleston, South Carolina mounted an amphibious expedition to cut the Charleston & Savannah Railroad.
On June 21, troops of the 55th Pennsylvania landed from the gunboat Crusader and transport Planter near Simmon's Bluff on Wadmelaw Sound, surprising and burning an encampment of the 16th South Carolina Infantry.
The Confederates scattered, and the Federals returned to their ships.
Despite this minor victory, the Federals abandoned their raid on the railroad.
Although a bloodless raid, this engagement typified scores of similar encounters that occurred along the South Carolina coastline.
Result(s): Union victory
Location: City of Charleston, South Carolina
Campaign: Operations against Charleston (1862)
Date(s): June 21, 1862
Principle Commanders: Lieutenant A.C. Rhind (USA); Colonel James McCullough (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Regiments
Estimated Casualties: None

Oak Grove, Virginia
French's Field, King's School House
June 25, 1862
First of the Seven Days' Battles.
On June 25, 1862, Major General George B. McClellan advanced his lines along the Williamsburg Road with the objective of bringing Richmond within range of his siege guns.
Union forces attacked over swampy ground with inconclusive results, and darkness halted the fighting.
McClellan's attack was not strong enough to derail the Confederate offensive that already had been set in motion.
The next day, Lee seized the initiative by attacking at Beaver Dam Creek, north of the Chickahominy.
Result(s): Inconclusive (Union forces withdrew to their lines)
Location: Henrico County, Virginia
Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March – September 1862)
Date(s): June 25, 1862
Principle Commanders: Major General George B. McClellan (USA); General Robert E. Lee (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Corps
Estimated Casualties: 1,057 total (USA 516; CSA 541)

Beaver Dam Creek, Virginia
Mechanicsville, Ellerson's Mill
June 26, 1862
Second of the Seven Days' Battles.
General Robert E. Lee initiated his offensive against McClellan's right flank north of the Chickahominy River. A.P. Hill threw his division, reinforced by one of D.H. Hill's brigades, into a series of futile assaults against Brigadier
General Fitz John Porter's V Corps, which was drawn up behind Beaver Dam Creek.
Confederate attacks were driven back with heavy casualties.
Jackson's Shenandoah Valley divisions, however, were approaching from the northwest, forcing Porter to withdraw the next morning to a position behind Boatswain Creek, just behind Gaines' Mill.
Result(s): Union victory
Location: Hanover County, Virginia
Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March – September 1862)
Date(s): June 26, 1862
Principle Commanders: Brigadier General Fitz John Porter (USA); General Robert E. Lee (CSA)
Forces Engaged: 31,987 total (USA 15,631; CSA 16,356)
Estimated Casualties: 1,700 total (USA 400; CSA 1,300)

Garnett's Farm & Golding's Farm
Civil War Virginia
June 27-28, 1862
Third of the Seven Days' Battles.
While battle raged north of the Chickahominy River at Gaines' Mill on June 27, 1862, Magruder demonstrated against the Union line south of the river on Garnett's Farm.
To escape an artillery crossfire, the Federal defenders from Major General Samuel P. Heintzelman's III Corps refused their line along the river.
The Confederates attacked again near Golding's Farm on the morning of June 28th but were easily repulsed.
These “fixing” actions heightened the fear in the Union high command that an all out attack would be launched against them south of the river.
Result(s): Inconclusive
Location: Henrico County, Virginia
Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March – September 1862)
Date(s): June 27-28, 1862
Principle Commanders: Major General George B. McClellan (USA);
Major General John B. Magruder (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Divisions
Estimated Casualties: 830 total

Savage's Station
Civil War Virginia
June 29, 1862
Fourth of the Seven Days' Battles.
On June 29, the main body of the Union army began a general withdrawal toward the James River. Magruder pursued along the railroad and the Williamsburg Road and struck Sumner's Corps (the Union rearguard) with three brigades near Savage's Station.
Confederate Brigadier General Richard Griffith was mortally wounded during the fight. Jackson's divisions were stalled north of the Chickahominy.
Union forces continued to withdraw across White Oak Swamp, abandoning supplies and more than 2,500 wounded soldiers in a field hospital.
Result(s): Inconclusive
Location: Henrico County, Virginia
Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March – September 1862)
Date(s): June 29, 1862
Principle Commanders: Major General Edwin Sumner (USA); Major General John Magruder (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Divisions
Estimated Casualties: 4,700 total (USA 2,500 wounded were captured)

Glendale, Virginia
White Oak Swamp, Riddell's Shop
June 30, 1862
This is the fifth of the Seven Days' Battles.
On June 30, 1862, Huger's, Longstreet's and A.P. Hill's divisions converged on the retreating Union army in the vicinity of Glendale or Frayser's Farm. Longstreet's and Hill's attacks penetrated the Union defense near Willis Church, routing McCall's division. McCall was captured.
Union counterattacks by Hooker's and Kearny's divisions sealed the break and saved their line of retreat along the Willis Church Road. Huger's advance was stopped on the Charles City Road. “Stonewall” Jackson's divisions were delayed by Franklin at White Oak Swamp.
Confederate Major General T.H. Holmes made a feeble attempt to turn the Union left flank at Turkey Ridge, but was driven back by Federal Navy gunboats on the James River.
Union generals Meade and Sumner and Confederate generals Anderson, Pender, and Featherston were wounded.
This was Lee's best chance to cut off the Union army from the James River.
That night, McClellan established a strong position on Malvern Hill.
Result(s): Inconclusive (Union withdrawal continued)
Other Names: Nelson's Farm, Frayser's Farm, Charles City Crossroads, White Oak Swamp, New Market
Road, Riddell's Shop
Location: Henrico County, Virginia
Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March – September 1862)
Date(s): June 30, 1862
Principle Commanders: Major General George B. McClellan (USA); General Robert E. Lee (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Armies
Estimated Casualties: 6,500 total

White Oak Swamp
Civil War Virginia
June 30, 1862
The Union rearguard under Major General William Franklin stopped Jackson's divisions at the White Oak Bridge crossing, resulting in an artillery dual, while the main battle raged two miles farther south at Glendale or Frayser's Farm.
White Oak Swamp can be considered part of the Glendale engagement.
Result(s): Inconclusive
Location: Henrico County, Virginia
Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March – September 1862)
Date(s): June 30, 1862
Principle Commanders: Major General William Franklin (USA); Major General Thomas J. Jackson (CSA)
Forces Engaged: Armies
Estimated Casualties: 500 total
Deo
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Ambrotype photo of Eugene A. Allen, CSA, of Abbeville

Photo of Lt. M. T. Hutchison

Cpl. Thomas Mosely Tucker

Pvt. Robert Barney Hutchison




 Links
Sons of Confederate Veterans (National) 
  Sons of Confederate Veterans (S.C. Division) 
Confederate Museum (16th Reg.--Greenville, S.C.)
B/G Samuel McGowan Camp 40 (Laurens, S.C.)
McGowan's Brigade Monument
William Farley OCR Chapter 15 (Laurens, S.C.)
16th S.C. Regiment
Southern Cross Of Honor
14th S.C. Regiment
Rosters
Confederate Cemetery Lists
Captain William Downs Farley
SCV Missouri Division
Sterling Price SCV Camp 145 (Missouri)
Aw, Shucks (Southern News and Links)
American Experience
The American Civil War Homepage
Savage Goodner SCV Camp 1513
Laurens County, SC Genweb
Capt. Moses T. Fowler Camp 1721(Fountain Inn, S.C.)
Palmetto Camp # 22  (Columbia, S.C.)
Joe Wheeler Camp 1245 (Aiken, S.C.)
Lt. Gen. Wade Hampton Camp No. 273 (Columbia, S.C.)
Sons of Mars SCV Camp 1632 (Laurel Hill, N.C.)
Capt. John F. McElhenny Camp #840  (Russell County, Va.)

Bill Hodges Gift of Life (please visit--they need your prayers.Thanks!)

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For information about the Sons of Confederate Veterans, call
1-800-MY SOUTH.
 (There is also the link above.)



Or

Olde Abbeville Camp #39 - SCV
 1077 Harpers Ferry Road
Iva, SC 29655


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Burt-Starke Mansion, Abbeville, S.C.


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Be sure to visit and support the Confederate Museum
 located at 15 Boyce Avenue in Greenville, S.C.
Here is the link to the museum's website.

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If you find a broken link or have something to contribute to this site, then please



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